Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Learn from your lifting partners


I've had this post bouncing around in my head the last couple of weeks, and then yesterday Randy wrote a post that helped tie together my thoughts.  I like when we're all thinking similar things at the same time.

The first part of Randy's post comparing lifting to chess is a great jumping-off point for my thoughts. You don't get better at lifting just by lifting. Granted, practice is very important, but you want to be a student of the sport. Understand why you move the way you do, try to figure out what you can do to make a movement better. A coach can tell you cues all day long, but unless you reflect on what you're doing, you won't learn - deliberate practice really is trying something and then paying attention to the outcome, and then trying something new.

How do you figure out what to try? One good way is to watch others doing the same lift as you. The 5:30 class is starting to get full (that's great! I love the energy of a full class!), so you generally have to share platforms now. When your partner is lifting, are you watching what they do? Or are you just sitting there waiting for your turn? Be an active participant in class. Pay attention to how your partner moves. Maybe it's something you can try, maybe you see something that they're doing that they didn't notice. Treat the others in your class as both good and bad examples.

Be careful though, because it's a fine line between being observant and trying to learn together and contradicting the coach in charge of the class. Try not to coach your partner because we may be working with them on something else, but please discuss your observations. Saying "your knees were caving in and you were on your toes on that last rep" is great. They may not have felt that problem - just don't try to give them 100 cues to fix the problem. (We may have already done that, or we may be ignoring that problem for something more serious.)

Pay attention, learn by watching, and help your partners learn by telling them what you saw. Being an active participant in class will help you learn to lift much better than just coming in and getting your reps done. That's why I love our small-group class format; you're all doing the same thing at the same time, so you can all learn from each other.



Workout

snatch push press 5x3

then

3 rounds with full recovery
run 400m
10 box jumps
10 burpees



Endurance Option

snatch push press 5x3

then/or

3 non-stop rounds below AeroMAx 
run 400m
10 box jumps
10 burpees



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