Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Why you need to keep a log

An example of a strength training log from one of our runners. Simple, low-tech, and very clear. and thorough. And did I mention this is a high school kid? 
Do you have a training log? We encourage you to keep a log of all your workouts and have your important numbers handy for a couple of reasons.

First, it's important to track your numbers to make strength gains. You can't effectively follow a linear progression in the strength portion of class if you're just trying to pull last week's numbers out of your head. If you're doing a program other than linear progression, there is still some kind of progression, and it's even harder to keep track of in your head, so write that down too!

Second, it's helpful to know your maxes to choose an appropriate weight in the workout. When we specify that your weight on a workout should be, say, 75% of your max squat, it helps to know your max squat and not just guess. There's a certain amount of leeway and feeling things out, but the percentage we give you is a good starting point to achieve the intended level of intensity in the workout. Ideally you have your maxes for the major lifts in your head, but it can be hard to keep track of everything, especially when you're newer to training and have only been doing these movements for a few months. So write them down!

Third, if you start having any issues, you can go back through recent entries to try to understand what might be triggering problems. Or if things are going really well, you can see what you've been doing to make sure you don't get off track.

I have to admit, I'm a numbers person and like tracking this stuff, so I have a hard time understanding why it's so tough to get folks to keep a log. You can use a fancy app on your phone if you like, and I know some people like to just take a photo of the workout as their log, but in my opinion, it's hard to beat the practicality of a simple paper notebook. Write down what you do each day, with all the details like what weights you used or any modifications you made, and maybe a note about how you're feeling, and any notes on any movements/skills you worked on. Have a separate page to track your maxes on all the major lifts (squat, front squat, overhead squat, deadlift, press, push press, clean, jerk, snatch), your best row times for the 500, 1K, and 2K, and your current level on any skills you care about (e.g., handstands, pull-up progressions). You can keep your log in the cubbies (we have a space for them), and if you need a little guidance rather than making your log from scratch, you can order the book we designed from our online store (it's available at cost, so we're not making anything off it).

Okay everyone, get on this! Taking your training seriously is more than just coming in to the gym; take responsibility for your own progress and you will see faster improvements.


Workout

deadlift 3x5
2 double KB C&J between sets

then

slowly work up to a heavy double OHS
a good rep pattern is 5-5-3-3-2-2
make sure you spend enough time warming up your shoulders



Endurance Option

accumulate 15 deadlifts at 5RM
2 double KB C&J between sets

then/or

slowly work up to a heavy double OHS
a good rep pattern is 5-5-3-3-2-2
make sure you spend enough time warming up your shoulders



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