I want my workouts to be short with a long rest

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Putting together these two blog posts: on probability distributions of training and non-linear injury repsonses - here's why we program for short, fast, and heavy.

You can specialize and try to get really good at something (in the blue, below) by working hard and spending a lot of time there. You'll be good at that one thing, but it won't translate outside of the narrow range of training. Your body will adapt to those specific demands. Plus spending all that time at those intensities will give you a much higher risk of injury.  That may be acceptable for a professional athlete who 1) has to be good at one thing, and 2) can afford all of the recovery work needed to prevent or rehab from injuries.

Or you can spend most of you time taking it easy and throw in a few heavy lifts, heavy swings, or fast sprints here and there. You'll get reasonably good at everything - the fat tail will extend even out beyond where you train. As a bonus, the place where you spend all of your time has low injury risk and the places where the intensity goes up, you're spending so little time there that the risk goes down too! This is where I want you to be. You need to be good at a bunch of things, you can't afford to specialize. And with your busy life you don't have the time to deal with injuries.

 You get better overall results with a few infrequent tail events and a long time recovering from those events than you do with long monostructural suffering

You get better overall results with a few infrequent tail events and a long time recovering from those events than you do with long monostructural suffering

It's healthier to be #lazystrong than it is to log the miles training for a marathon.

Michael Deskevich